After my Baby is born, how can I stay healthy?

09/06/2017

Pregnancy and the time after you deliver your baby can be wonderful, exciting, emotional, stressful, and tiring—all at once. These feelings may cause you to overeat, not eat enough, or lose your drive and energy. Being good to yourself can help you cope with your feelings and follow healthy eating and physical activity habits.

After you deliver your baby, your health may be better if you try to return to a healthy weight. Not losing weight may lead to overweight or obesity later in life. Returning to a healthy weight may lower your chances of diabetes, heart disease, and other weight-related problems.

Healthy eating and physical activity habits after your baby is born may help you return to a healthy weight faster and give you energy.

BEFORE your baby is born

  • Make sure you are eating foods rich in Folate (folic acid), iron, calcium, protein, vitamin B12, vitamin D, and other needed nutrients. Ask your health care provider about prenatal supplements (vitamins you may take while pregnant).
  • Eat breakfast every day.
  • Eat foods high in fiber and drink plenty of water to avoid constipation.
  • Cut back on “junk” foods and soft drinks.
  • Avoid alcohol, raw or undercooked fish, fish high in mercury, undercooked meat and poultry, and soft cheeses.
  • Be physically active on most, or all, days of the week during your pregnancy. If you have health issues, talk to your health care provider before you begin.

AFTER your baby is born

  • Keep eating well. Eat foods from all of the food groups. Check with your Nutritionist on what is good to eat.
  • Check with your health care provider first, then slowly get used to a routine of regular, moderate-intensity physical activity, like a daily walk. This type of activity will not hurt your milk supply if you are breastfeeding.
  • Sleep when the baby sleeps.
  • Watch a funny movie.
  • Ask someone you trust to watch your baby while you nap, bathe, read, go for a walk, or go grocery shopping.
  • Explore groups that you and your newborn can join, such as “new moms” groups.

 

REFERENCE

https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-topics/weight-control/tips-for-two-pregnancy/Pages/fit-for-two.aspx

pecadomo

Milk and dairy products are an
important part of the daily diet in many regions of the world

Know more